Tag Archives: privacy

Facebook Apps that read your data

When you share information with your friends on Facebook, every app that your friends use can access and use that information. Read this post for further information.

Of course it’s better to think of all your data on Facebook as public, but still it’s hard to accept to share data with apps you can’t control.

There’s a way to stop this flow, though. Go to your Privacy Settings and follow this path:

Privacy settings
Apps and websites : Edit settings
How people bring your info to apps they use : Edit settings

Here you can customize the information you share with other people’s apps. Other than that, you can just turn off all the apps:

If you don’t want apps and websites to access other categories of information (like your friend list, gender or info you’ve made public), you can turn off all Platform apps. But remember, you will not be able to use any games or apps yourself.

The importance of being sorry

Dave Morin, CEO of Path, is sorry.

Path used to copy and store your agenda from your mobile to its servers. They also didn’t notify the users about it.

So Dave decided to apologize:

We believe you should have control when it comes to sharing your personal information. We also believe that actions speak louder than words. So, as a clear signal of our commitment to your privacy, we’ve deleted the entire collection of user uploaded contact information from our servers.

Taking responsibility is the first step to gain your customers’ trust. That’s so nice of you, Dave.


New privacy policy on Google

On March, 2012, Google is changing its privacy policy.

All the information about you on all your Google profiles will be aggregated in order to create a unique experience through each Google platform. This will “improve” each one’s experience with Google Ads, as well.

Is there any way to avoid it? Apparently, just one:

Users won’t be able to opt out. If they don’t like the change, Google has said, they can avoid signing into their accounts or stop using Google products altogether.

You can check your Ads Preferences on this page and your Web History here. It’s a lot of stuff Google knows about you and it’s used to tailor the advertising messages for you.

How can we try and protect our privacy then? Here’s some advice from Forbes.


Google, myself and I

When you use Google and its many services, how do you identify yourself? According to Google blog, there are a few options: you can be unidentified, use a pseudonymous or be identified.

But there’s far more than that. As someone said, your online identity is determined not only by what you post, but also by what others post about you – whatever it is. When someone googles you, the SERPs are a mix of all this.

As far as June 2011 Google released an improved Dashboard page in order to manage as precisely as possible your web reputation.

Here you can manage the Alert service about you, edit your profile – here’s mine – and link all your profiles around the web.

So far so good, it’s all about you. But there are also some ways to influence SERPs: you can try and remove a page from the SERPs and manage your reputation in an effective way.

Moreover, from the Dashboard you can access and manage pretty much every existing Google service: Analytics, Calendar, Docs, Gmail, Groups, Maps, Picasa, Reader, Youtube, Chrome sync, Adwords, navigation history and so on.


1 click login for everyone

Passpack lets you share your passwords with your team. Freemium model and desktop software included.

Its creator is blogging about his time in San Francisco: take a look.


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