Category Archives: Web Analysis

A Twitter with no replies

Don’t you think it’s annoying to read all the reply tweets on a Twitter profile? Yes, I do too. And guys at Twitter as well. When you visit a Twitter user’s profile, you may want to read original content rather than conversations.

Since June 2012, when you visit some verified profiles, you’ll see their tweets without replies. That is, you won’t see tweets that begin with a @username. But you can always switch to all tweets.

By the way, tweets beginning with a @username are only seen by people who follow both the tweet author and the @username at the beginning of the tweet. Let’s hope we’ll see this features on every profile then!

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Be Social like the Vice industries #PWES3

What can we learn about Social Media from alcohol, drugs and porn industries? Like, a lot. Here is a little consideration by Alekone at the #PWES3 Social Media event.

First of all, players in these markets can’t use the regular advertising on Google or Facebook, but they still have a lot of money to spend. So what do they do? Innovation.

In the Eighties VHS beat Betamax because the porn industry chose the former and not the latter. Some recent innovations by these industries are: video live streaming, mobile payments, on-demand video, live video chat, long tail marketing. Chris Anderson‘s Long Tail theory fits perfectly the porn industry: for instance, where else would you find Japanese girls licking door knobs?

More interesting things:

  • Great numbers on these sites – Youporn makes 2% of Internet traffic by itself, Xvideos is the third most visited site in the world.
  • Marketing strategies of drugs sites – Follow them on Twitter and get a free joint

Finally we have:

fewer marketing tools = more innovation.

More community engagement, more tailored contents, more micro-targeting.

Here is the complete presentation. All the presentations from #PWES3 are here. Let’s communicate like the vice industries do!


Our dark side on Social Media

A few days ago I found this picture shared by an Italian musician on Facebook.

It’s a newspaper article about the systematic killing of stray dogs in Ukraine. Because of the European soccer championship, the journalist says, the Ukrainian government ordered the massacre of 30.000 stray dogs. The origin is the work of the photographer Andrea Cisternino.

What I find extremely interesting is not the fact itself. Take a look at some reactions on Facebook.

What am I supposed to think? That animal lovers are racist?

I think that we do not consider that what we write online is public for anyone to read. I think that what we may say in a moment of rage shouldn’t be something your aunt and your employer can read two years from now. I also think that we have the pointless tendency to blame the easiest target available. I hope these people don’t really believe in what they wrote.

Besides, I wonder whether this kind of stuff is related to the Social Media platforms or not. Is Facebook made to show the dark side of people? 

Who uploaded the picture said that Facebook is a great way to make information. I see people distorting this information in any way they like. Is there something wrong in this process? The whole conversation is online here.


Twitter? You’re doing it wrong

This morning we had another big earthquake in Northern Italy. Buildings collapsing, people without a house, at least 13 corpses so far.

It goes without saying, people is using Twitter a lot. People is tweeting useful information such as how to open wifi networks, which telephone numbers you can call, where to go and donate blood, and so on.

Moreover, some people used the hashtag #terremoto for business purposes:

Groupalia wrote: Scared with the #earthquake? Let’s give up and go to #SantoDomingo! (link). Brux Sport and Prenotable did pretty much the same thing. Of course, many people felt the urgence to insult the poor common sense of these businesses. Take a look here. Eventually Groupalia did a public apology.

My point: Twitter defines itself as a “real time information network“. Groupalia obviously did it wrong, but people using the main hashtag #terremoto to insult Groupalia is also a pain in the ass. It’s white noise. It’s like you have to make an important call and the phone lines are too busy. Besides, I don’t like people blaming the first available target. The ground isn’t stopping to shake because of your indignation.

Just saying.

More of this: 1 2 3 4. Reply @lorenzograndi4 if you wish.


Facebook Apps that read your data

When you share information with your friends on Facebook, every app that your friends use can access and use that information. Read this post for further information.

Of course it’s better to think of all your data on Facebook as public, but still it’s hard to accept to share data with apps you can’t control.

There’s a way to stop this flow, though. Go to your Privacy Settings and follow this path:

Privacy settings
Apps and websites : Edit settings
How people bring your info to apps they use : Edit settings

Here you can customize the information you share with other people’s apps. Other than that, you can just turn off all the apps:

If you don’t want apps and websites to access other categories of information (like your friend list, gender or info you’ve made public), you can turn off all Platform apps. But remember, you will not be able to use any games or apps yourself.

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